Covid and Aspirin: A "Convenient" Shift in Recommendations - Granite Grok
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Here, we juxtapose:

OOHAspirin and COVID-19:

The researchers analyzed data of 10,477 persons who had been tested for COVID-19 during the first COVID-19 wave in Israel from February 1, 2020 to June 30, 2020. Aspirin use to avoid the development of cardiovascular diseases in healthy individuals was associated with a 29% lower likelihood of COVID-19 infection, as compared to aspirin non-users. The proportion of patients treated with aspirin was significantly lower among the COVID-19-positive individuals, as compared to the COVID-19-negative ones. And those subjects who had been treated with aspirin were less associated with the likelihood of COVID-19 infection than those who were not. Moreover, the group observed that the conversion time of SARS-CoV-2 PCR test results from positive to negative among aspirin-using COVID-positive patients was significantly shorter, and the disease duration was two-three days shorter, depending upon the patients’ pre-existing conditions.

Aspirin Lowers Risk Of COVID: New Findings Support Preliminary Israeli Trial

The team investigated more than 400 COVID patients from hospitals across the United States who take aspirin unrelated to their COVID disease, and found that the treatment reduced the risk of several parameters by almost half: reaching mechanical ventilation by 44%, ICU admissions by 43%, and overall in-hospital mortality by 47%.

OTOH: Baby aspirin no longer recommended to prevent first heart attack in older adults, US task force says

People over the age of 60 should no longer consider taking a daily low-dose or baby aspirin to prevent a first heart attack or stroke, according to a draft recommendation issued by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Tuesday.

The announcement marks a change in the 2016 Task Force guidance that recommended aspirin therapy in certain men and women to lower cardiovascular risk. But more recent evidence suggests it also could cause harm, including bleeding in the stomach, intestines, and brain – a risk that increases with age and can be life-threatening.

So.  Not long after it’s discovered that aspirin, one of the best-known and longest-around medications there is, can significantly help reduce infection rates, hospitalizations, deaths, etc., and now the “conventional wisdom” suddenly shifts to telling people to avoid it?  How… conveeeeeeeeenient.

As Surak says in almost every post: “They really do want you dead”.